Categories for Guest Post

Catherine Milne on Getting a Job in Book Publishing

Words: Catherine Milne I can still vividly remember the moment when I knew I wanted to work in publishing.  It was after my first and only visit to my university careers service.  I’d finished my arts degree and was desperate for a job, any job. I spotted an ad for something called a National Education Representative at Penguin Books.  Right, I thought. I can do that. Whatever that is. READ MORE

The Cutest Book Submission From Five-Year-Old Girl!

Catherine Milne book submission

One of the joys of working in publishing is that you never quite know what you’re going to receive in your email inbox every morning – a hot new manuscript that you’ll fall in love with, an approach from an author with a new story to tell, or news about an exciting project...  But yesterday morning, there was something quite different.  READ MORE

Q&A with Daniel Silva: author of the Gabriel Allon novels

Known as the master of the modern spy thriller, Daniel Silva is the award-winning, #1 New York Times bestselling author of 19 novels, most recently The Black Widow, House of Spies and now The Other Woman. His books are published in more than thirty countries and are bestsellers around the world. After releasing a series of ripped-from-the-headlines thrillers covering stolen masterpieces, ISIS terrorists and religious plots, Silva and Allon have turned their attention to Putin's Russia in The Other WomanREAD MORE

Meet Kiki Button: socialite, private detective and spy

1920s Paris is my ultimate fantasy destination. Ever since I read Among the Bohemians by Virginia Nicholson, I have been fascinated (read: obsessed) with it. Nicholson’s book explores the lives of bohemian, artistic London from 1900 to WWII – not their work, but how they dressed, where they lived, what they ate, how they created lives as artists, rebels, and thrill-seekers. READ MORE

Tessa Lunney on Female detectives in Fiction

I came late to crime. During my teens, my peers delved into the dark recesses of noir, while my mother and aunts explored murders in Ancient Rome, Medieval England and 1960s Oxford. Instead, I was poring over Shakespeare and Keats, I was involved with D H Lawrence and Jane Austen, I was discovering the joys of working in a bookshop. Crime was too grisly, with its serial killers and forensic dissections. Crime was too dark and I was a sensitive soul. Crime was nothing like anything I was taught at school or university. I gave it a wide berth. READ MORE

1 2 3 5