Thank You For Entering The Banjo Prize

Words: Catherine Milne, Head of Local Fiction Publishing When we dreamed up the idea of the Banjo Prize – as a way of finding Australia’s next great storyteller – I wasn’t sure what we could expect.  It’s quite one thing to dream up something like this, and quite another thing to put it out into the world.  Maybe, I thought hopefully to myself, just maybe, we might get some interest.  After all, while there are quite a few well established literary prizes out there – the Vogel and the Richell Prize, just to name a couple – there’s not so many competitions out there for people who just want to tell rippingly good stories. READ MORE

Winter Reading Guide

Winter is the perfect time to cosy down on the couch and get some serious reading done. In fact, winter is the perfect time to be a book lover – you can light a fire, make yourself a huge cup of tea and stay in bed reading as long as you like. We’ve collected some of our favourite classic, current and upcoming reads to inspire your winter TBR pile. READ MORE

Meet Kiki Button: socialite, private detective and spy

1920s Paris is my ultimate fantasy destination. Ever since I read Among the Bohemians by Virginia Nicholson, I have been fascinated (read: obsessed) with it. Nicholson’s book explores the lives of bohemian, artistic London from 1900 to WWII – not their work, but how they dressed, where they lived, what they ate, how they created lives as artists, rebels, and thrill-seekers. READ MORE

A Literary Map of Australia

May 25, 2018 History 2 Comments

Continuing our 130-year celebration as the ‘home to Australian stories’, Australian illustrator Oslo Davis created this pictorial map for us, in the vein of similar vintage iterations. In trademark ink and watercolour, Davis brings to life the people, places and stories that have shaped the HarperCollins literary landscape, by way of Angus & Robertson Publishers. READ MORE

Read an extract: The Shanghai Wife by Emma Harcourt

May 24, 2018 Sample 0 Comments

  Forbidden friendship, political conspiracy and incendiary passion draw Australian woman Annie Brand deep into the glamour and turmoil of 1920s Shanghai. Leaving behind the loneliness and trauma of her past in country Australia, Annie Brand arrives to the political upheaval and glittering international society of Shanghai in the 1920s. Journeying up the Yangtze with her new husband, the ship's captain, Annie revels in the sense of adventure but when her husband sends her back to Shanghai, her freedom is quickly curtailed. Against her will, Annie finds herself living alone in the International Settlement, increasingly suffocated by the judgemental Club ladies and their exclusive social scene: one even more restrictive than that she came from. Sick of salacious gossip and foreign condescension, and desperate to shake off the restrictions of her position in the world, Annie is slowly drawn into the bustling life and otherness of the real Shanghai, and begins to see the world from the perspective of the local people, including the servants who work at her husband's Club. But this world is far more complex and dangerous than the curious Annie understands and, unknowingly, she becomes caught in a web of intrigue and conspiracy as well as a passionate forbidden love affair she could not have predicted: one with far–reaching consequences... ‘Emma's book is lyrical and beautiful...she has written a love story as dangerous and exotic as the worlds she describes.' Caroline Overington, author of The Lucky One and The One That Got Away In stores from June 18th, 2018. Click here to find out more! READ MORE

Tessa Lunney on Female detectives in Fiction

I came late to crime. During my teens, my peers delved into the dark recesses of noir, while my mother and aunts explored murders in Ancient Rome, Medieval England and 1960s Oxford. Instead, I was poring over Shakespeare and Keats, I was involved with D H Lawrence and Jane Austen, I was discovering the joys of working in a bookshop. Crime was too grisly, with its serial killers and forensic dissections. Crime was too dark and I was a sensitive soul. Crime was nothing like anything I was taught at school or university. I gave it a wide berth. READ MORE

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