Tessa Lunney on Female detectives in Fiction

I came late to crime. During my teens, my peers delved into the dark recesses of noir, while my mother and aunts explored murders in Ancient Rome, Medieval England and 1960s Oxford. Instead, I was poring over Shakespeare and Keats, I was involved with D H Lawrence and Jane Austen, I was discovering the joys of working in a bookshop. Crime was too grisly, with its serial killers and forensic dissections. Crime was too dark and I was a sensitive soul. Crime was nothing like anything I was taught at school or university. I gave it a wide berth. READ MORE

4 Books We Can’t Stop Talking About

April 24, 2018 Recommendations 0 Comments

We read them, we loved them and now we can't stop talking about these phenomenal books! These are the novels that keep us up at night thinking about what happens next - they're multi-layered, complex and beautiful reads that will stay with you. If you're at a loss for what to read or want to find a great book for your book club, we've got you covered!  READ MORE

7 Buddy Reads About Friendship!

April 19, 2018 Recommendations 0 Comments

Here at HarperCollins, we've been celebrating a month of friendship in honour of one of our very favourite fictional characters, Eleanor Oliphant. We've assigned staff with 'buddies' to perform anonymous, random acts of kindness for each other - it could be taking care of a random work task for someone or buying a them a morning coffee - simple things that brighten up their day! READ MORE

The story behind ‘The Last of the Bonegilla Girls’

April 18, 2018 Guest Post 0 Comments

by Victoria Purman Bonegilla is the Bonegilla Migrant Reception Centre, a spawling ex-Army camp on the River Murray in north-eastern Victoria, near Albury-Wodonga. Between 1947 and 1971, more than 320,000 people passed through there after arriving in Australia, looking for new lives and better opportunities. The small community is called Bonegilla and pronounced Bone-Gilla. But the camp came to be know as Bon-neg-illa as that’s the way migrants began pronouncing it when they arrived there. And although it’s thought to have come from a local indigenous name meaning deep water hole or big cattle camp, it does sound Italian so I can see why its usage changed. READ MORE

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